standard output

A weblog of nerdy opinions and other detritus
by Michael Shane.

May 17, 2013 at 5:59pm

Soon.

Soon.

May 2, 2013 at 2:18pm

I think Google Glass goes pretty well with a fedora.

November 10, 2012 at 6:02pm — Reblogged from fuckyeahrachelmaddow

Presented without comment.

(Source: fuckyeahrachelmaddow, via blogthoven)

November 4, 2012 at 3:12pm

Empire of the In-Between →

Adam Davidson, in an essay for The New York Times:

That doesn’t stop both presidential candidates from constantly invoking the magnificent working-class economy we once had and can have again, if only we give them our vote.

[…]

Calling for a return to the days when everybody who was willing to put in a hard day’s work could make a good living at the factory is a fantasy, maybe a lie and certainly an implicit acknowledgment that nobody has any idea what to do with the underemployed in the slums of Trenton, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Southeast D.C. It’s safer to talk about Pakistan.

12:18am

Film Crit Hulk on plot holes and movie logic →

This is one of the best things I have ever read. I know it’s one of the best things I’ve ever read because I wish I had written it.

WE BELIEVE IN CHARACTERS BECAUSE THEY ARE OUR ANCHORS TO EXPERIENCE. OUR VESSELS. AND SAVE FOR THE OCCASIONAL MOVIE WHERE WE ARE MEANT TO LARGELY LOOK AT THESE CHARACTERS IN EXTERNAL TERMS (COENS PLAY WITH THIS BEAUTIFULLY), THEY ARE THE LENS THROUGH WHICH WE ABSORB THE CINEMATIC WORLD. CHARACTER IS OUR VESSEL INTO IDEOLOGIES AND THEMES AND UNDERSTANDING OF THE WORLD. IN THIS MEDIUM THAT SCULPTS IN TIME, THEY ARE OUR SIGN POSTS ON THE WAY TO UNDERSTANDING LIFE’S NARRATIVE. MEANING, YES, CHARACTER IS SO MUCH CLOSER TO WHY WE GO TO THE MOVIES. IT ALL COMES TO PASS… IF WE WERE MAKING A PROOF OF HOW A MOVIE WORKS: CHARACTER AND THAT CHARACTER’S CONNECTION TO THE THEME WOULD BE OF GREATEST POSSIBLE SIGNIFICANCE.

IT IS THE VERY PURPOSE OF STORYTELLING.

[…]

EVEN THEN, HULK ADMITS THAT MOVIES ARE MYSTERIOUS, COMPLEX THINGS. CERTAIN THINGS WORK FOR MOST PEOPLE. CERTAIN THINGS DON’T. CERTAIN THINGS HIT THE ZEITGEIST. CERTAIN THINGS DON’T. THIS DOESN’T MEAN WE SHOULD THROW UP OUR HANDS AND SUBMIT TO THE DEPLORABLE GOLDMAN IDIOM OF “NOBODY KNOWS ANYTHING,” BUT INSTEAD COME TO REALIZE THAT THE FINAL EQUATION OF A MOVIE IS AN INORDINATELY COMPLEX THING THAT DOESN’T QUITE DEPEND ON SIMPLE LOGIC. EVEN TO HULK. MOVIES ARE FULL OF MOVING PARTS AND ENCOMPASS SO DAMN MUCH TO CONSIDER THAT IT ISN’T EVEN FUNNY. BUT HULK ARGUES THAT THIS COMPLEXITY IS ACTUALLY AN INVITATION FOR US TO PEER IN AND SEE WHAT MOVIES CAN BE ABOUT.

October 19, 2012 at 3:33pm

Behind the mask: being yourself as someone else at New York Comic Con →

It was a privilege to work with my amazing colleagues at The Verge on this feature about the people who make New York Comic Con (and cons in general) culturally valuable and generally awesome places. Take a look.

Bonus: our video team likes horse masks.

October 10, 2012 at 10:19am
Style change is usually linked to economic factors, as all of you know who have read Marx. Also fatigue occurs when people see too much of the same thing too often. So every ten years or so there is a stylistic shift and things are made to look different. Typefaces go in and out of style and the visual system shifts a little bit. If you are around for a long time as a designer, you have an essential problem of what to do. I mean, after all, you have developed a vocabulary, a form that is your own. It is one of the ways that you distinguish yourself from your peers, and establish your identity in the field. How you maintain your own belief system and preferences becomes a real balancing act. The question of whether you pursue change or whether you maintain your own distinct form becomes difficult. We have all seen the work of illustrious practitioners that suddenly look old-fashioned or, more precisely, belonging to another moment in time. And there are sad stories such as the one about Cassandre, arguably the greatest graphic designer of the twentieth century, who couldn’t make a living at the end of his life and committed suicide. But the point is that anybody who is in this for the long haul has to decide how to respond to change in the zeitgeist. What is it that people now expect that they formerly didn’t want? And how to respond to that desire in a way that doesn’t change your sense of integrity and purpose.

— Milton Glaser (Via The New Graphic)

September 9, 2012 at 1:48pm — Reblogged from eaterofbirds

Child’s Play

Child’s Play

(Source: eaterofbirds, via sinyasiki)

August 25, 2012 at 3:55pm
In my own view, the important achievement of Apollo was a demonstration that humanity is not forever chained to this planet, and our visions go rather further than that, and our opportunities are unlimited.

— Neil Armstrong (1930 – 2012)

(Source: theverge.com)

June 23, 2012 at 6:01pm

Yo dawg.

Yo dawg.